A.E.M. Baumann

© 2018

hatterscabinet@gmail.com

 

Buy the book on Amazon ---

 

About The Knossian Oracles


 

Note to the Reader

Epigraphs

 

The Knossian Oracles

      Περὶ Ποιητικῆς . . .

            1   2   3

      Daedalus in Tartarus

            4   5   6

      L'Origine, Salomé I

            7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15

            16   17

      L'Origine, Salomé II

            18   19   20   21   22   23   24

      The Night Sea Crossing

            25   26   27   28   29   30

      The Garden of Venus

            31

      The Incantations of Isis and
      Osiris

            32   33   34   35   36

      Imago Dei

            40   41   42   43   44   45   46

      The Seven Dreams of Paris

            47   48   49   50   51   52

      The Axiom of Maria
      Prophetissa

            53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60

            61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68

            69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76

            77   78   79   80   81   82   83

 

And the Light Falls, Remir

      Mystery

      Arcanum

      Alchemy

      The Occult

      Love

      Art

      Grace

 

Notes

      Translations

      Table of Fragments

      An Incomplete Bibliography

 

 


 

to Hatter's Cabinet Main Page

 

 

Works Significant to the Writing of The Knossian Oracles

(An Incomplete Bibliography)

The Oracles were written over a period of many years, and many texts had influence upon its writing. Of course, there are the primary source materials, mostly in the areas of myth, mysticism, and esoterica (though not exclusively, as with Gray’s Anatomy and Daphne and Chloe). There are also the critical and theoretic texts as regards those areas and others (like psychology, and literary theory, and I cannot understate the value for writers of exploring theory and criticism in the plastic arts). There are also the many texts read toward stylistic explorations. Most of the texts in the list below were intentionally read or re-read during conceiving and writing of the Oracles; though, obviously, not everything of influence needs to have been ‘intentionally’ read. Sometimes a found thing is discovered to be an important thing; sometimes importance appears long after the reading.

The purpose of this list is to cite source material, yes. But it is also motivated by that more intimate desire to share one’s holdings and findings (something not unlike showing treasures found on a beach). The list was generated over the years of the writing, and to be honest I can no longer give reason or cause to the presence of everything in the list. Similarly, the list can only ever be incomplete: most deficient, as might be expected, in the literary works. For example, Robert Duncan does not appear on the list, but then the influence of his poetry has been a broadly sweeping one, not one over-greatly concentrated upon any singular work. The Black Rider is the only musical work listed, though I leave out the criticism read on Mahler’s 3d. I almost wholly leave out the criticism read on erotic art and literature, but then that is a constant pleasure of mine, and to chose any one would be a falsehood.

That something is listed does not give it primacy over something that was by happenstance left off: at times one, or two works will stand for many more. As well, I have made effort here to be over inclusive to avoid creating the deception that any one or small number of works are of far greater importance than any other. That said, this cannot avoid being incomplete: outside the need to keep track of certain source materials, the list can be described as but part of the play during the writing the Oracles, and a short (but equally enjoyable) game of remembering – or trying to remember – after.