A.E.M. Baumann

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About The Knossian Oracles


 

Note to the Reader

Epigraphs

 

The Knossian Oracles

      Περὶ Ποιητικῆς . . .

            1   2   3

      Daedalus in Tartarus

            4   5   6

      L'Origine, Salomé I

            7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15

            16   17

      L'Origine, Salomé II

            18   19   20   21   22   23   24

      The Night Sea Crossing

            25   26   27   28   29   30

      The Garden of Venus

            31

      The Incantations of Isis and
      Osiris

            32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39

      Imago Dei

            40   41   42   43   44   45   46

      The Seven Dreams of Paris

            47   48   49   50   51   52

      The Axiom of Maria
      Prophetissa

            53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60

            61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68

            69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76

            77   78   79   80   81   82   83

 

And the Light Falls, Remir

      Mystery

      Arcanum

      Alchemy

      The Occult

      Love

      Art

      Grace

 

Notes

      Translations

      Table of Fragments

      An Incomplete Bibliography

 

 


 

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A Note to the Reader:

The reader who approaches this work as though it were a collection of poems will read it falsely, and will do both this book and themselves a disfavor. While some of the fragments here may stand more or less successfully independently of the whole, everything within the covers of this book feeds into and off each other, and is meant to be read as such. Engagement with any one fragment is dependent upon its being read within that flow of energies (albeit, it is a flow that is as often as not more synchronic than progressive in nature). This includes the second text, And the Light Falls, Remir, which should be considered part of the whole and not an independent work, its “historical” relationship to that which precedes it (as pointed to in the title of this volume) being informative of its ideational positioning within the whole of this book.

The text that follows is woven out of sources taken from myth (from many regions), alchemy and esotericism, the older traditions and tales of magic and witchcraft, religion, psychology, and literature and the arts. I do not believe there is any knowledge requisite to engaging this text, though a reader who is unfamiliar with the stories of Daedalus, Pasiphaë, and the Labyrinth will undoubtedly be at a disadvantage. (Naucrate was Daedalus’s wife while he was at Knossos; she was a servant in the court.) Finally, some information as to source material can be found in the “Full Table of Fragments” at the end of this volume.